So will I | Amanda Cook

Here’s the song , “So will I” (Hillsong United) sung by Amanda Cook at Bethel. What I love about this song is that it’s a heart response to the wonder all around us that declares the glory of God (see my post, “Worship is a response to God“). And our response is not just about gratitude for all that God gives us but it also becomes transformational in the interaction. 

Everything in the universe spins and responds to the Great Dance, declaring the glory of God, as the psalmist says:

The heavens declare the glory of God;
And the firmament shows His handiwork.
Day unto day utters speech,
And night unto night reveals knowledge.
There is no speech nor language
Where their voice is not heard.
Their line has gone out through all the earth,
And their words to the end of the world. (Psalm 19:1-4 NKJV)

As Paul told the Roman believers, “For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead….” (Rom.1:20).

And as the writer of Hebrews echoes:

By faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that the things which are seen were not made of things which are visible. (Heb.11:3 NKJV)

Worship is our heart’s response to this reality, as the bridge of this song beautifully puts it:

If the stars were made to worship so will I
If the mountains bow in rev’rence so will I
If the oceans roar Your greatness so will I
For if ev’rything exists to lift You high so will I
If the wind goes where You send it so will I
If the rocks cry out in silence so will I
If the sum of all our praises still falls shy
Then we’ll sing again a hundred billion times

Of course, this song, like the psalms, is written as poetic genre. God doesn’t literally tell the wind where to go (well, Jesus did once!); He set up nature to do so. Rocks don’t literally cry out, mountains don’t literally bow down, oceans don’t roar, stars don’t literally worship. But they do worship in the sense that their awesome splendor reflects the beauty and transcendence of the God who holds them together (Col.1:16-17). We do the same when we reflect the nature of Christ as we follow Him.

For me, it’s intuitive to see evidence for God everywhere I look. I believe we can see His invisible attributes when we are smitten by beauty and awe and majesty…we understand it because we exist, breathe air, we create, we love, we have a conscience, we have infinite value and eternal purpose. We see it in compassion given to the helpless, mercy given to the unkind, grace given to the undeserving, in the self-sacrifice of one for the welfare of another…even when we didn’t want Him we see His other-centered love for us on the cross.

Sadly, I think, as C.S. Lewis once said, “To some God is discoverable everywhere, to others nowhere.” We must have a willing heart in order to see anything.

One more thing. As you listen to this song, take heart, precious sought-out one.  The answer to what you’re looking for is found in His embrace. And our worship is just a response to that wonderful discovery.

And as You speak
A hundred billion failures disappear
Where You lost Your life so I could find it here
If You left the grave behind You so will I
I can see Your heart in everything You’ve done
Every part designed in a work of art called love
If You gladly chose surrender so will I

So Will I (100 Billion X)
Written by Benjamin Hastings | Joel Houston | Michael Fatkin
© 2017 Hillsong Music Publishing (Admin. by Capitol CMG Publishing)

About Mel Wild

God's favorite (and so are you), a son and a father, happily married to the same beautiful woman for 40 years. We have three incredible adult children. My passion is pursuing the Father's heart in Christ and giving it away to others. My favorite pastime is being iconoclastic and trailblazing the depths of God's grace. I'm also senior pastor of Cornerstone Church in Wisconsin.
This entry was posted in Faith, Love, Worship and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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