More real that the ground I’m standing on

I’ve talked a lot about God and science and faith, so I thought I would briefly talk about what faith means to me. One line in a song says it all for me, “You’re more real than the ground I’m standing on.” This comes from a song by Jonathan David Helser titled, “Abba.” I’ve included a recent rendition of this song below. 

First, let me make a distinction. Science is a methodology to observe and test natural things. Science cannot address the question of God or anything that may or may not exist beyond the natural world. Faith tells us that science, the cosmos, everything we can experience with our natural senses was framed by a world that we cannot see or prove with our natural senses.

3 By faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that the things which are seen were not made of things which are visible. (Heb.11:3 NKJV)

The only reason people deny that God exists is because they only believe what they can see, taste, touch, smell, or hear (called naturalism or materialism).

But we also have what is called intuition or a “knowing” that defies physical explanation. From the beginning, there’s been an “inner knowing” that there must be something bigger than this fishbowl we call the cosmos. So, it’s not unreasonable to think there’s an explanation for our continuing existence that’s not part of the material construct. But it does take a different kind of knowing.

14 But the natural man does not receive the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him; nor can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned. (1 Cor.2:14 NKJV)

The truth is, our natural thought processes cannot fully comprehend what Scripture is speaking to us because it requires more than just our intellectual assent. We must open our hearts and allow it to take us beyond the echo of our own thoughts into God’s very own thoughts.

15 But he who is spiritual judges all things, yet he himself is rightly judged by no one. 16 For “who has known the mind of the Lord that he may instruct Him?” But we have the mind of Christ. (1 Cor.2:15-16 NKJV)

For me, when I talk to people who only believe in what they can see, my argument can only be like shadows.  It’s not the real thing. That’s all words can be…metaphors and one-dimensional reflections of  dynamic multi-dimensional realities.

Arguments never won me to Christ so one can’t talk me out of it either.

I didn’t accept Christ’s invitation into ever-increasing glory because of fear of death or hell or tribulation. I didn’t care about those things.

I wanted to know Him.

And He has not disappoint me.

You see, I rarely think about the Kingdom of God in terms of the after-life or heaven, although that’s also wonderful, because heaven is in me and I’m in heaven now (Luke 17:21; Eph.2:6; Phil.3:20; Heb.12:22-24). I’ve had many experiences and encounters with God that defy explanation or coincidence. But those things aren’t even why I believe. I believe because I’ve found the Fountain of Life Himself. He unlocked all the mysteries of my soul and poured out His love on me, over and over and over again. As the song goes…

You’re more real than the ground I’m standing on
You’re more real than, the wind in my lungs
Your thoughts define me, you’re inside me
You are my reality

His thoughts toward me, as David said, are more than all the grains of sand in the world, too wonderful to even contemplate, yet there’s such joy in the contemplation. And, as I interact with His Spirit, He redefines and reshapes me in ways I had no mental grid for. I wouldn’t even know how to ask the right question.

So, I believe—not because God has to prove Himself to me, or because the argument for God is more compelling than the one that denies His existence. I believe because I have been profoundly and forever affected by His affection, awestruck by His brilliance, humbled by His splendor and majesty, and confronted, healed, and empowered by His living Word that’s…sharper than the sharpest two-edged sword, cutting between soul and spirit, between joint and marrow. It exposes my innermost thoughts and desires. (Heb.4:12)

There’s so much more I could say, but I will end with this: I’ve been on this magnificent journey for 40 years now. And, in spite of my fickle heart, He’s  proven Himself faithful. His love only grows sweeter and stronger with each passing day. He’s so intimate and gentle, yet so transcendent and other-than. He’s my Abba, and I belong to Him.

 And because we are his children, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, prompting us to call out, “Abba, Father.” (Gal.4:6 NLT)

This is another song that resonates deeply with me because it expresses my heart as I continue my sojourn through this life in my heavenly Father’s embrace. I hope you will join me in the journey.

About Mel Wild

God's favorite (and so are you), a son and a father, happily married to the same beautiful woman for 40 years. We have three incredible adult children. My passion is pursuing the Father's heart in Christ and giving it away to others. My favorite pastime is being iconoclastic and trailblazing the depths of God's grace. I'm also senior pastor of Cornerstone Church in Wisconsin.
This entry was posted in Faith, Heaven on earth, Identity, Love, Sonship, Worship and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to More real that the ground I’m standing on

  1. Amen, Mel! I’ve had a few close encounters of the God kind, too. What always comes across so loud and clear is how real He is, more real than I am. He gets real. 🙂

    Recently my pastor spoke of simply trying to tell some people that Jesus loves them, but it was like they could hear the words but didn’t speak the language. It’s very sad and frustrating sometimes, but I try to remember that. Some people are looking at me the same way I look at someone trying to explain computer coding or car mechanics.

    Math is something I can understand somewhat, but if you think about it, math isn’t “real” in the sense of being material and natural. Math is pretty cut and dry, but it too requires some intuition and some “knowing.” I can scratch some symbols on a piece of paper, but without that “knowing”, it’s just going to look like meaningless chicken scratch.

    • Mel Wild says:

      It’s both interesting and sad how people do not hear or see. This is especially true when reading the Bible. As Jesus said in Matthew 13, quoting Isaiah, they don’t see or hear because they have closed their eyes and ears…

      ‘Hearing you will hear and shall not understand,
      And seeing you will see and not perceive;
      15 For the hearts of this people have grown dull.
      Their ears are hard of hearing,
      And their eyes they have closed,
      Lest they should see with their eyes and hear with their ears,
      Lest they should understand with their hearts and turn,
      So that I should heal them’

      But then Jesus said to those who have opened their eyes and hearts to Him….

      16 But blessed are your eyes for they see, and your ears for they hear; 17 for assuredly, I say to you that many prophets and righteous men desired to see what you see, and did not see it, and to hear what you hear, and did not hear it.

      Good point about Math and spiritual things. Math is the only thing we can prove yet, in and of itself, it’s abstract and has no physical existence. It’s the “shadow” representing something more. And you do have to know the language, otherwise it’s just symbols, numbers, and letters on a page that have no meaning.

  2. Nan says:

    Just offering my opinion for whatever it’s worth … this is the type of blog post that I would expect from a Christian pastor who wishes to share his faith with anyone who enters his blog world.
    Other posts of yours have indicated a desire to “educate,” but your heart comes across in this one. And if reaching “the lost” is your goal … this type of writing far exceeds some of your other posts.

    • Mel Wild says:

      Thanks Nan. You’re right, this is where my heart is. I will say that I’ve written over 600 posts for the first four years of my blogging that are more like this (Why it’s called, “In My Father’s House,” btw). I got into apologetics (which is not my thing, really) because I felt that God wanted me to. I saw how believers were being bullied by anti-Christians attacking their faith with what I saw as poor arguments. I can’t just sit back and watch people being talked out of something so wonderful because they’re not prepared for such an onslaught. Anyway, I think my apologetics posts are more temporary, in this season, than what I write here. But I will say my foray has helped me understand the issues on both sides.

      • John Branyan says:

        The wicked anti-Christian approves of this post. She is, of course, not persuaded by it but you should be thrilled she took a break from her hateful mockery to pat you on the head.

  3. thiedeann says:

    Thanks so much! My heart resonated with every word! For me it’s been 46 years, and He still grows sweeter in my life. God bless!

  4. Great post Mel! I know you and I have discussed the role of apologetics and I agree it has its place and audience. But well done articulating you testimony as in the ongoing reality of Jesus. And if someone chooses to try to discount it on rational grounds we can break out our apologetic again! Blessings!

  5. Jodi Woody says:

    Thanks, Mel! Good word.

  6. Cindy Powell says:

    “Arguments never won me to Christ so one can’t talk me out of it either.” So true–and I am so grateful for that truth. I think I mentioned recently the quote that ” A man with an argument is no match for a man with an experience.” I’ve often wished there was some way to translate our personal experience of God’s goodness to others, but I think it simply has to be lived–with the hope that as we live out the experience His goodness, it flows out of us as an invitation to others. What’s funny is that nearly every one of my unbelieving family members (which is most of them) have, at one time or another, said they “wish” they had my faith. I never quite know how to respond to that, except to say He is just as accessible to them as He is to me. But, and I think this is the big one, taking that step into His open arms DOES mean being willing to lay aside our need to understand and be in control of everything. Some folks just don’t seem to want to give that up. But I’m glad He is so incredibly patient and persistent. :-). PS – that song holds a special place in my heart – thanks for sharing it <3. Blessings to you!

    • Mel Wild says:

      ” A man with an argument is no match for a man with an experience.”

      That pretty much says it all right here! As God said in Deut.29:29, whatever is revealed to us belongs to us. In our culture that only values head knowledge, we think we know something because we have a degree, or worse, read it on Wikipedia. LOL! It’s like thinking you know what it’s like to love your own child when you’ve never had a child. You can study up on it all you want, you will never know what it’s like to experience that kind of love. And, of course, this is why an experience can never be adequately explained because it requires a similar experience for someone else to understand it.

      But, and I think this is the big one, taking that step into His open arms DOES mean being willing to lay aside our need to understand and be in control of everything. Some folks just don’t seem to want to give that up.

      That’s a huge one there! The kingdom of God works the opposite of the world construct. In our world, seeing is believing. Jesus says we won’t see until we believe. Our need to understand everything is wanting to be in control, yet we don’t often really understand it until after we commit to it. That’s what Kierkegaard meant by the term, “a leap of faith” (which is where we get the expression). Giving up our right to have to know everything in advance before we will commit to is a huge leap for most of us. Kind of like love. 🙂

      Always appreciate your comments, Cindy. Blessings to you, too!

  7. KIA says:

    Science is a methodology to observe and test natural things. Science cannot address the question of God or anything that may or may not exist beyond the natural world. Faith tells us that science, the cosmos, everything we can experience with our natural senses was framed by a world that we cannot see or prove with our natural senses.

    Are you then confessing that science and Faith are necessarily incompatible? Why then the huge effort to use science to demonstrate the existence of God? Why not rest on Faith Alone and be done with it? Is there a reason that you would not feel comfortable doing that instead of your science and philosophy apologetics?

    • Mel Wild says:

      Are you then confessing that science and Faith are necessarily incompatible?

      Huh? How did you make that conclusion? I’m saying that science can only tell us about the natural world. It cannot tell us about God or anything that may or may not exist outside of the natural world. Science cannot explain the metaphysical or ontological, why we continue to exist, or even why there are natural laws that we can discover in the first place.

      For the believer, science explains God’s creation. All of creation declares the glory of God. His attributes are clearly seen in all that He has made. So, I have faith that science will continue to discover and unlock more of the mysteries of the cosmos. But it cannot explain God or why there should be a cosmos.

      Faith is believing in what cannot be demonstrated yet you have confidence there is a valid reason for your faith, whether it’s in the natural world or not. I have faith in science, but have no faith whatsoever that science can tell me about God. That would be a fallacious assumption. Science cannot give me a worldview, it can only explain what’s in the world. But it’s a false dichotomy to say it’s either faith or science. It’s both and. I have faith in science because I believe that God made a world that can be discovered and made sense of. But I also “know” by faith that there’s something more to our existence than the physical world.

  8. Lily Pierce says:

    This is a beautiful post. So many poignant one or two sentence phrases one could take out and use. Amen!

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